Math versus Literacy?

numbers and lettersOne possible concern about focusing on mathematics at an early age is that too much focus on mathematics could take time away from learning crucial language and literacy skills. There’s an incredible body of research on the importance of early literacy, and no parent, caregiver, or educator would want to detract from a child’s literacy and language development.

But recently, as I’ve been digging in to the research on early mathematics learning, I came across the intriguing finding: Early mathematics skills may be a better predictor of later reading achievement than early reading skills. For example, a large study of the effects of various school-entry skills on later achievement showed that “early math skills have the greatest predictive power, followed by reading and then attention skills” for both boys and girls, and for children from high and low socioeconomic backgrounds (1). Another study on the effects of a high quality, intensive preschool math curriculum on children’s later language and literacy abilities showed that children who were taught from the math curriculum performed as well as the control group on some skills, and better on most skills (2).

These studies aren’t alone. The evidence is not perfect and doesn’t yet address why the link between early math and later literacy might exist. But I find the idea that strong, early math exposure could also boost a child’s language and literacy development to be fascinating.

And, honestly, it’s not all that surprising to me. Talking with your child about numbers or shapes or measurement is still talking to your child. Asking your child how they thought about a simple addition problem gives them opportunity to articulate their thought processes. Making sense of the world through quantities and spatial reasoning is still making sense of the world. Bringing math talk and math play into a child’s world, in ways that are fun and challenging and build on their natural curiosity, provides them with even more and broader contexts for making use of language and interpreting symbols and recalling facts and ideas from memory and linking ideas.

References

(1) G. J. Duncan et al., School readiness and later achievement. Developmental Psychology 43, 1428 (2007).

(2) J. Sarama, A. Lange, D. H. Clements, C. B. Wolfe, The impacts of an early mathematics curriculum on emerging literacy and language. Early Childhood Research Quarterly 27, 489 (2012).

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